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Wright Library Princeton Theological Seminary

Curated Bibliographies

Books and other resources you may find of interest

Biblical Studies Faculty Recommended Commentaries & Monographs

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Old Testament

Commentaries and Important Monographs on Books of the Old Testament

Recommended by the Department of Biblical Studies, Princeton Theological Seminary, Revised 2010


Books of the Old Testament

Genesis

"For the book of Genesis, two excellent theological commentaries include Walter Brueggemann, Genesis, Interpretation (Westminster John Knox, 1982) and, more recently, Terence Fretheim, “Genesis” in The New Interpreter’s Bible, Volume 1 (Abingdon, 1994). I recommend Claus Westermann’s three-volume commentary on Genesis for those interested in a full range of discussion of critical issues, with emphasis on the European tradition of scholarship. Another example of a more in-depth critical and theological commentary is Gordon Wenham, Genesis 1-15 and Genesis 16-50, Volumes 1 and 2, Word Biblical Commentary (Word, 1987, 1994). Literary scholar Robert Alter’s Genesis, Translation and Commentary (Norton, 1996) offers a translation that seeks to keep close to the original Hebrew and a commentary with literary sensibilities."

Exodus

A standard critical and theological commentary on Exodus remains Brevard Childs, The Book of Exodus, Old Testament Library (Westminster John Knox. 1974). Childs includes a full range of discussions on historical-critical matters, larger Old Testament context, New Testament context, and history of exegesis. It has weathered well over 30 years. Good theological commentaries include Walter Brueggemann, “Exodus” in The New Interpreter’s Bible, Volume 1 (Abingdon, 1994) and Terence Fretheim, Exodus, Interpretation (Westminster John Knox, 1991). Mention should also be made of Waldemar Janzen, Exodus, Believers Church Bible Commentary (Herald, 2000) and, for those desiring some very heavy-lifting in their study of the scholarship on Exodus, Cornelius Houtman, Exodus, Volumes 1-3, Historical Commentary on the Old Testament (Kok, 1993, 1996, 2000) (excellent and detailed reviews of scholarship and history of interpretation). For those desiring more heavy-lifting in their study of Exodus, Thomas Dozeman's Exodus, Eerdman's Critical Commentary (Eerdman's, 2009) is very well done and incorporates the latest in Pentateuchal scholarship. One should also mention Cornelius Houtman, Exodus, Volumes 1-3, Historical Commentary on the Old Testament (Kok, 1993, 1996, 2000) (detailed reviews of scholarship and history of interpretation) and William Propp's two-volume Anchor Yale Bible commentary on Exodus 1-18 (Yale, 1999) and Exodus 19-40 (Yale, 2006) (extensive notes on translation and critical issues).

Leviticus

This sometime overlooked book has been blessed by several recent and excellent commentaries. One fine theological commentary is Samuel Balentine, Leviticus, Interpretation (Westminster John Knox, 2003). Jacob Milgrom is a Jewish scholar who has spent a lifetime studying Leviticus. He published a three-volume commentary on Leviticus in the Anchor Bible series, but he has also released a more compact but still thorough one-volume commentary: Leviticus: A Book of Ritual and Ethics (Augsburg Fortress, 2004). One could also note two other possibilities from a more evangelical perspective: Gordon Wenham, Leviticus (New International Commentary on the Old Testament) (Eerdmans, 1979) and Walter Kaiser, “Leviticus,” in The New Interpreter’s Bible, Volume 1 (Abingdon, 1994).

Numbers

One scholar some decades ago called the book of Numbers the “junk room of the Bible” since he could not make sense of what seemed to be the disorganized jumble of genres and texts in Numbers. Fortunately, several recent commentaries have sought to revise that view with attention to the careful structure and theological fruit of this sometimes neglected book. Options include Dennis Olson, Numbers, Interpretation (Westminster John Knox, 1996); Timothy Ashley, Numbers (New International Commentary on the Old Testament (Eerdmans, 1996); Katharine Sakenfeld, Journeying with God, A Commentary on the Book of Numbers (Eerdmans, 1995), and Jacob Milgrom, JPS Torah Commentary on Numbers (Jewish Publication Society, 1990) among many others.

Deuteronomy

The rich and theologically important book of Deuteronomy is well represented among commentaries. A sound critical and exegetical study is Richard Nelson, Deuteronomy, Old Testament Library (Westminster John Knox, 2002). An in-depth study of Deuteronomy that includes some history of its interpretation in history and culture is Mark Biddle, Deuteronomy (Smyth & Helwys, 2003). Good theological commentaries include Patrick Miller, Deuteronomy, Interpretation (Westminster John Knox, 1991); J. G. McConville, Deuteronomy: Apollos Old Testament Commentary (Intervarsity Press, 2002); Walter Brueggemann, Deuteronomy, Abingdon Old Testament Commentaries (Abingdon, 2001); and Dennis Olson, Deuteronomy and the Death of Moses, A Theological Reading (Wipf & Stock, 2005).

Joshua

A fine critical and exegetical study of Joshua is Richard Nelson, Joshua, Old Testament Library (Westminster John, Knox, 1997), now available in paperback. L. Daniel Hawk, Joshua, Berit Olam, Studies in Hebrew Narrative and Poetry (Liturgical Press, 2001) offers a more literary approach to Joshua.

Judges

Recommendations for this Old Testament account of Israel’s judges like Deborah, Gideon, Jephthah, and Samson include Dennis Olson, “Judges,” The New Interpreter’s Bible, Volume 2 (Abingdon, 1998); J. Clinton McCann, Judges, Interpretation (Westminster John Knox, 2002); and David Gunn, Judges, Blackwell Biblical Commentaries (Blackwell, 2005).

1-2 Samuel

For the theological interpretation of 1-2 Samuel, start with Walter Brueggemann’s First and Second Samuel (Interpretation, 1990) or Eugene H. Peterson’s First and Second Samuel (Westminster Bible Companion, 1999). Antony F. Campbell has published a much more recent set of commentaries (1 Samuel, 2003; 2 Samuel, 2005) in the FOTL series. Campbell is sensitive to issues of the book’s development without losing sight of the fact that this text is a part of the Jewish-Christian canon. Normally, the Old Testament Library is a good theological series. However, for Samuel, the OTL volume by Hans Wilhelm Hertzberg (I & II Samuel) may overwhelm the pastor with too much historical and compositional data, although students with a more historically-oriented interest will find it helpful for tracing the lines of argumentation back through early twentieth-century European thought. Kyle McCarter’s very technical two book series is an invaluable resource for advanced students looking for text-critical data (I Samuel, 1980; II Samuel, 1984; Anchor Bible), and Ralph Klein’s 1 Samuel (Word Bible Commentary, 1983) is a good semi-technical volume in the same vein as Campbell’s. 

1-2 Kings

Recommendations for this theological account of Israel’s history, from the death of David and the accession of Solomon in the 10th BCE to the release of Judah’s exiled king Jehoiachin in the 6th BCE, include: Choon-Leong Seow, “1-2 Kings,” The New Interpreter’s Bible, Volume 3 (Abingdon, 1999), an excellent literary and theological commentary; Richard Nelson, First and Second Kings, Interpretation (Westminster John Knox, 1987), which offers rich theological insights with pastors in mind; Terence Fretheim, First and Second Kings, WBC (Westminster John Knox, 2000); and Walter Brueggemann, 1 and 2 Kings: A Commentary (Smyth and Helwys Publishing, 2000).

Isaiah

For most of the twentieth century, scholars have tended to treat the book of Isaiah in three parts—First Isaiah (chapters 1-39), Second Isaiah (chapters 40-55), and Third Isaiah (chapters 56-66). More recently, however, some commentators have deemed it important to read the book as a whole, regardless of the different origins of the parts. In this mold are the works of John Goldingay in the New International Biblical Commentary series (Hendrickson, 2001) and Brevard Childs in the Old Testament Library series (Westminster/John Knox, 2001). Also recent are the commentaries that focus on the history of the Bible and its reception. In this category are the Church’s Bible, with Isaiah edited by Robert L. Wilkens with Angela R. Christman and Michael J. Hollreich (Eerdmans, 2007) and John Sawyer’s The Fifth Gospel: Isaiah in the History of Christianity (Cambridge University Press, 1996).

Jeremiah

For basic textual, critical and exegetical issues, a recent resource is Leslie Allen, Jeremiah (Old Testament Library) (Westminster John Knox, 2008). Two fine theological commentaries on Jeremiah and the God of Jeremiah are Walter Brueggemann, A Commentary on Jeremiah: Exile and Homecoming (Eerdmans, 1998) and Terence Fretheim, Jeremiah: Smyth and Helwys Bible Commentary (Smyth and Helwyx, 2002).

Ezekiel

Daniel I. Block. The Book of Ezekiel. 2 vols. Grand Rapids: Erdmans, 1997. A useful work in the evangelical stream. Moshe Greenberg. Ezekiel 1-37 : a New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1983, 1997. The first major commentary to attend to the literary features of Ezekiel and to consider the book holistically, with less attention to redactional arguments. Still a very valuable resource with excellent insights. Robert W. Jenson. Ezekiel. Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible. Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2009. Written by a systematic theologian, it offers insightful theological reflections on the text. Best used in conjunction with a more traditional commentary. Paul Joyce. Ezekiel: A Commentary. New York; London, T & T Clark, 2007. Summarizes scholarly positions very effectively. Good resource. Margaret Odell, Ezekiel. Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary. Macon, GA: Smith & Helwys, 2005. Very user friendly format, with attention to some of the history of interpretation. Steven Tuell. Ezekiel. NIBC. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2009. Thoughtful commentary with a slightly evangelical perspective. Walther Zimmerli. Ezekiel : a Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Ezekiel. Hermeneia. 2 vols. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1979-1983. This English translation of the original 1969 German is a classic, magisterial commentary that attends to the minute details of Ezekiel’s text, which one expects from Hermeneia commentaries. Outdated in some ways (e.g., intense focus on redactional arguments), it is still an important resource.

Hosea

Francis I. Andersen, David Noel Freedman. Hosea : A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1980. Hans Walter Wolff. Hosea: a Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Hosea. Hermeneia. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1974.

Joel

John Barton. Joel and Obadiah. Old Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001. By a first-rate biblical scholar.

Amos

Jörg Jeremias. The Book of Amos : a Commentary. Old Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1998. James L. Mays. Amos: A Commentary. Old Testament Library. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1969. Predecessor to Jeremias’ commentary, this venerable tome is excellent.

Obadiah

John Barton. Joel and Obadiah. Old Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001. William P. Brown. Obadiah Through Malachi. Westminster Bible Companion. Louisville: Westminster John Knox 1996. The author is a wonderful interpreter of biblical texts.

Jonah

William P. Brown. Obadiah Through Malachi. Westminster Bible Companion. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996. Daniel Smith-Christopher. Jonah, Jesus, and Other Good Coyotes : Speaking Peace to Power in the Bible. Nashville: Abingdon, 2007. The author is a biblical scholar, and though not a commentary, this book is thought-provoking.

“Minor Prophets”

For these shorter prophetic books, three commentaries covering these books as a group are particularly recommended for their theological emphasis. These are The New Interpreter’s Bible (NIB) vol. VII (Abingdon, 1996), various authors listed below under individual books; William P. Brown, Obadiah through Malachi, Westminster Bible Companion, (Westminster John Knox, 1996); and Elizabeth Achtemeier Nahum – Malachi, Interpretation (John Knox 1986). Brown highlights general theological and ethical themes, while Achtemeier makes more explicit reference to Christian doctrines and NT passages.

Micah

The NIB author (see above) is Daniel Simundson; see also Brown, above. Juan I. Alfaro, Justice and Loyalty: A Commentary on the Book of Micah, International Theological Commentary (Eerdmans 1989) approaches Micah from a liberationist perspective. James Limburg’s Hosea-Micah, Interpretation (John Knox, 1988) is theologically focused for teaching and preaching. James L. Mays, Micah, Old Testament Library (Westminster, 1976) is a classic with good balance of historical-critical information and theological insights. Also of interest to the more technical user are Delbert Hillers in the Hermeneia series (Fortress, 1984) and Hans Walter Wolff (tr. G. Stansel, Augsburg, 1990, from the 1982 German original).

Nahum

The NIB author (see above) is Francisco O. García-Treto; see also Brown and Achtemeier, above. Julia Myers O’Brien, Nahum (Sheffield Academic/ Continuum, 2002) offers a literary reading with focus on ethical questions, especially issues of gender and violence. J.J.M. Roberts, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah, Old Testament Library (Westminster John Knox 1991) provides an accessible presentation of textual issues, ancient Near Eastern backgrounds, and literary forms.

Habakkuk

The NIB author (see above) is Theodore Hiebert; see also Brown and Achtemeier, above. J.J.M. Roberts, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah, Old Testament Library (Westminster John Knox 1991) provides an accessible presentation of textual issues, ancient Near Eastern backgrounds, and literary forms. Francis I. Anderson in the Anchor Bible series (Doubleday, 2001) offers a much longer and more technical treatment.

Zephaniah

The NIB author (see above) is Robert A. Bennett; see also Brown and Achtemeier, above. Adele Berlin in the Anchor Bible series (Doubleday 1994) incorporates both modern critical scholarship and pre-modern Jewish interpretation. Marvin A. Sweeny (Augsburg Fortress, 2003) offers a detailed text-critical and exegetical study in the Hermeneia series tradition. J.J.M. Roberts, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah, Old Testament Library (Westminster John Knox 1991) provides an accessible presentation of textual issues, ancient Near Eastern backgrounds, and literary forms.

Haggai

The NIB author (see above) is W. Eugene March; see also Brown and Achtemeier, above. Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P. gives a theologically focused reading for the church in his Rebuilding with Hope: Haggai and Zechariah, International Theological Commentary (Eerdmans, 1988). Since most scholars associate Zechariah chs 1-8 with the era of Haggai, some commentary series combine these into a single volume. Representative is David Petersen, Haggai and Zechariah 1-8, Old Testament Library (Westminster John Knox 1984), who provides detailed attention to the historical setting of these materials, along with literary analysis. A lengthier and more technical treatment is available from Carol Meyers and Eric Meyers, Haggai and Zechariah 1-8, Anchor Bible (Doubleday, 1987).

Zechariah

The NIB author (see above) is Ben. C. Ollenburger; see also Brown and Achtemeier, above. Also theologically focused is Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P., Rebuilding with Hope: Haggai and Zechariah, International Theological Commentary (Eerdmans, 1988). The book of Zechariah is in two quite distinct parts, chs. 1-8 and 9-14. As noted above under Haggai, major commentary series combine the first half of Zechariah with the book of Haggai (see listings above). The second half of Zechariah, chs 9-14, is sometimes correspondingly combined with Malachi in one volume (see listing below).

Malachi

The NIB author (see above) is Eileen M. Schuller, O.S.U.; see also Brown and Achtemeier, above. For a more detailed work, showing connections with Zechariah 9-14, see David Petersen, Zechariah 9-14 and Malachi, Old Testament Library (Westminster John Knox, 1995).

Psalms

There are numerous commentaries on the Psalms. The most helpful for preachers are probably James Mays’s volume in the Interpretation series (John Knox, 1994) and J. Clinton McCann’s contribution in the New Interpreter’s Bible, Volume 4 (Abingdon, 1996). There are not many great commentaries that deal with the details of the Psalms. Erich Zenger’s commentary in the Hermeneia series is the best of these, though only the volume on Psalms 51-100 has appeared in English (Fortress, 2005). Also helpful is Hans-Joachim Kraus’s commentary published originally in German but translated into English and published by Fortress press in 1988-89. Not to be missed, though, not strictly a commentary is Patrick D. Miller’s Interpreting the Psalms (Fortress, 1986).

Job

In recent years, a number of commentaries have been published that help the reader appreciate the literary excellence and theological contributions of the book. Arguably the best among these is Carol Newsom’s work in the New Interpreter’s Bible, Volume IV (Abingdon, 1996). For a consistently sensitive theological reading of the book, Samuel E. Balentine’s volume in the Smyth and Helwys Bible Commentary seriesis without peer (Smyth and Helwys, 2006). Especially interesting in this work are the numerous forays into the reception history of the book in literature, music, and the visual arts. Other noteworthy commentaries include David J. A. Clines’s three-volumecontribution in the Word Biblical Commentary series (Word, 1989-2009) and Norman Habel’s volume in the Old Testament Library series (Westminster, 1985).

Proverbs

For detailed exegesis, there are now two important works: Michael V. Fox’s two volumes in the Anchor Bible series (volume 1 by Doubleday, 2000; volume 2 by Yale University Press, 2009) and Bruce K. Waltke’s two volumes in the New International Commentary series (Eerdmans, 2004). The best theological treatments of the book are Raymond van Leeuwen’s contribution in the New Interpreter’s Bible, Volume V (Abingdon, 1997) and Christine Roy Yoder’s commentary in the Abingdon Old Testament Commentaries series (Abingdon, 2009).

Ruth

On the book of Ruth, Katharine Sakenfeld, Ruth, Interpretation (Westminster John Knox, 1999), considers the cultural diversity of readings of Ruth along with a sustained literary and theological commentary. André LaCocque, Ruth (Augsburg Fortress, 2004), is a very recent and thorough critical commentary with attention to issues of language, culture, and interpretation. A different kind of commentary treatment is Ellen Davis and Margaret Adams Parker, Who Are You, My Daughter: Reading Ruth through Image and Text (Westminster John Knox, 2003) which offers a new translation, notes and a series of 20 artistic woodcuts that interpret the book of Ruth through visual image along with the text. Another three-volume resource for commentaries on the lectionary preaching texts (Old Testament, Gospels and Epistles) from the Revised Common Lectionary is The Lectionary Commentary, Theological Exegesis for Sunday’s Texts (Eerdmans, 2001).

Song of Songs

The Song is also now well served by good English language resources. M. Pope’s behemoth of a commentary in the Anchor Bible series (Song of Songs [AB 7C; New York: Doubleday, 1977]) remains a classic, idiosyncratic to be sure, but chalked full of all kinds of delightful tidbits and still very much worth consulting. Two of the most well rounded commentaries on the Song—both solid philologically and literarily inclined—are M. Fox’s The Song of Songs and the and the Ancient Egyptian Love Songs (Madison: University of Wisconsin, 1985) and J. C. Exum’s Song of Songs (OTL; Louisville: WJK, 2005). R. Murphy’s slim volume in the Hermeneia series (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1990) is also solid. For those with German, Y. Zakovitch’s Das Hohelied (HThKAT; Freiburg: Herder, 2004) is highly recommend, especially for his wonderful literary sensibility. O. Keel’s The Song of Songs (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1994) is notable for its use of iconography. There are two provocative attempts at a more literary rendering of the Song: M. Falk, Love Lyrics from the Bible: A Translation and Literary Study of the Song of Songs (Sheffield: Almond, 1982) and A. Bloch and C. Bloch, The Song of Songs: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary (New York: Random House, 1995). For a sampling of recent feminist writing on the Song, see A. Brenner and C. Fontaine, The Song of Songs: A Feminist Companion to the Bible (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic, 2000). Other recent collections of essays on the Song include the July 2005 issue of the journal Interpretation and Perspectives on the Song of Songs—Perspektiven der Hoheliedauslegung (ed. A. C. Hagedorn; BZAW; Berlin: W. de Gruyter, 2005). For a brief overview of the Song, see F. W. Dobbs-Allsopp, “Song of Songs” in The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, vol 5: S-Z (ed. K. Doob Sakenfeld; Nashville: Abingdon, forthcoming 2009) and stay tuned for T. Linafelt’s forthcoming contribution on the Song in the Berit Olam series.

Ecclesiastes

There used to be a dearth of good theological commentaries on Ecclesiastes, but the situation has changed. The most detailed treatments of the book that also pay attention to the theological issues are C. L. Seow’s commentary in the Anchor Bible series (Yale University Press, 1997) and Craig Bartholomew’s work published by Baker Academic Press in 2009. For pastors and lay people, William P. Brown’s volume in the Interpretation series may be especially helpful.

Lamentations

Since 1991 and the publication of I. Provan’s contribution on Lamentations in the New Century Bible Commentary series (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans), Lamentations has been well served by some very fine commentaries in English. D. R. Hillers, Lamentations (AB 7A; 2d rev ed; New York: Doubleday, 1992) remains the most philologically rich commentary available (those with German may still usefully consult W. Rudolph’s Klagelieder [KAT 17/3; Gütersloh, 1962], especially on text critical issues; now see also the text critical comments by R. Schäfer in BHQ and B. Albrektson, Studies in the Text and Theology of the Book of Lamentations [Lun,d 1963]). More literarily minded commentaries include, A. Berlin, Lamentations (OTL; Louisville: WJK, 2002), F. W. Dobbs-Allsopp, Lamentations (IBC; Louisville: WJK, 2002), and K. O’Connor, “Lamentations” in NIB VI, pp. 1011-72 (Nashville: Abingdon, 2001)—the latter two probe relevant theological issues as well. Among notable recent monographs on Lamentations, see C. Westermann, Lamentations: Issues and Interpretation (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1994), T. Linafelt, Surviving Lamentations (Chicago: University of Chicago, 1999), K. O’Connor, Lamentations and the Tears of the World (Maryknoll: Orbis, 2002), C. Mandolfo, Daughter Zion Talks Back: A Dialogic Theology of the book of Lamentations (Atlanta: SBL, 2007), C. Maier, Daughter Zion, Mother Zion: Gender, Space, and the Sacred in Ancient Israel (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2008), and W. Morrow, Protest Against God: The Eclipse of a Biblical Tradition (Sheffield: Sheffield Phoenix, 2006). Also keep an eye out for E. Greenstein’s forthcoming contribution on Lamentations in the new JPS Torah series.

Ezra-Nehemiah

H. G. M. Williamson, Ezra, Nehemiah, WBC (Word, 1985) offers an excellent interpretation of these books, with thorough discussion of contemporary scholarship. Ralph Klein, “Ezra-Nehemiah,” The New Interpreter’s Bible, Volume 3 (Abingdon, 1999) is a good hermeneutical resource for the preacher, as is Mark Throntveit, Ezra-Nehemiah, Interpretation (Westminster John Knox, 1992).

Esther

The story of this biblical heroine has captured the imagination of Jews (and Christians) over the centuries, and there are a number of commentaries that attend well to the book’s literary dimension. Michael V. Fox, Character and Ideology in the Book of Esther (University of S. Carolina Press, 1991) is a rich study that focuses on Esther as a literary work and considers also the theological significance of a book that never mentions God. Jon D. Levenson, Esther: A Commentary, OTL (Westminster John Knox, 1997) incorporates rabbinic material in addition to standard historical-critical words. Sidnie White Crawford, “The Book of Esther,” The New Interpreter’s Bible, Volume 3 (Abingdon, 1999) offers helpful reflections for the preacher, including the story’s ethical implications for today.

Daniel

For heavy lifting in critical, textual and background material on the book of Daniel, the standard remains John Collins, Daniel: A Commentary on the Book of Daniel (Hermeneia) (Fortress, 1994). An older but very fine commentary by Louis Francis Hartman and Alexander A. Di Lella, Daniel ([Anchor Bible] Garden City NJ: Doubleday, 1978) is also to be highly recommended. Two insightful, reliable and theologically suggestive commentaries are W. Sibley Towner, Daniel (Interpretation) (Westminster John Knox, 1984) and Leong Seow, Daniel (Westminster Bible Companion) (Westminster John Knox, 2003).

1-2 Chronicles

Sara Japhet, I & II Chronicles: A Commentary, OTL (Westminster John Knox, 1993) offers a thorough critical and exegetical study of these OT books. H.G. M. Williamson, 1 and 2 Chronicles, NCB (Eerdmans, 1982) is another excellent and detailed commentary that incorporates insights from his other work, Israel in the Books of Chronicles.

New Testament

Commentaries and Important Monographs on Books of the New Testament

Recommended by the Department of Biblical Studies, Princeton Theological Seminary, Revised January 2019


Books of the New Testament

Matthew

  • Black, C. Clifton. The Lord’s Prayer. Interpretation. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2018.
  • Boring, M. Eugene. “The Gospel of Matthew: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 87-505 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 8. Nashville: Abingdon,1995.
  • Brown, Raymond E. The Birth of the Messiah: A Commentary on the Infancy Narratives in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke. New updated edition. Anchor Bible Reference Library. New York: Doubleday, 1993.
  • ________. The Death of the Messiah: From Gethsemane to the Grave. A Commentary on the Passion Narratives in the Four Gospels. Anchor Bible Reference Library. New York: Doubleday, 1994.
  • Davies, W. D., and Dale C. Allison, Jr. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to Saint Matthew. 3 vols. International Critical Commentary. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1988–97.
  • Evans, C.A. Matthew. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012.
  • Hagner, Donald. Matthew. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas: Word, 1993-95.
  • Harrington, Daniel. The Gospel of Matthew. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville: Liturgical, 2002.
  • Jorgensen, D. W. Treasure Hidden in a Field: Early Christian Reception of the Gospel of Matthew. Boston: De Gruyter, 2016.
  • Love, S. L. Jesus and Marginal Women:The Gospel of Matthew in Social-Scientific Perspective. Cambridge: James Clarke, 2010.
  • Luz, Ulrich. Matthew 1-7: A Commentary. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Augsburg, 1989.
  • ______. Matthew 8–20: A Commentary. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2001.
  • ______. Matthew 21-28: A Commentary. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress: 2005.
  • Vine, C.E. W. The Audience of Matthew: An Appraisal of the Local Audience Thesis. New York: Bloomsbury/T & T Clark, 2014.
  • Waetjen, H. C. Matthew’s Theology of Fulfillment, Its Universality, and Its Ethnicity: God’s New Israel as the Pioneer of God’s New Humanity. New York: Bloomsbury/T & T Clark, 2017.

Mark

  • Black, C. Clifton. Mark. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 2011.
  • ________. The Disciples According to Mark: Markan Redaction in Current Debate. 2nd ed. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012.
  • Boring, Eugene. Mark. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2006.
  • Brown, Raymond E. See under Matthew (1994).
  • Collins, Adela. Mark: A Commentary. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2007.
  • Culpepper, R. A. Mark. Macon, GA: Smyth & Helwys, 2007.
  • Dewey, J. The Oral Ethos of the Early Church: Speaking, Writing, and the Gospel of Mark. Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2013.
  • Donahue, John R., and Daniel J. Harrington. The Gospel of Mark. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville: Liturgical, 2002.
  • Edwards, James R. The Gospel According to Mark. Pillar New Testament Commentary Series. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2002.
  • Hooker, Morna D. A Commentary on the Gospel According to St Mark. Black's New Testament Commentary. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1991.
  • Juel, Donald H. The Gospel of Mark. Interpreting Biblical Texts. Nashville: Abingdon, 1999.
  • Malbon, E.S. Mark’s Jesus: Characterization as Narrative Christology. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2009.
  • Marcus, Joel. Mark 1–8: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible 27. New York and London: Doubleday, 2000.
  • ________. Mark 8–16: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible 27A. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009.
  • Moloney, Francis. Mark: Storyteller, Interpreter, Evangelist. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2004.

Luke

  • Bailey, K.E. Poet & Peasant and Through Peasant Eyes: A Literary-Cultural Approach to the Parables in Luke. Combined edition. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000.
  • Black, C. Clifton. See under Matthew (2018).
  • Bovon, François. Luke 1. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2002.
  • ________. Luke 2. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2013.
  • ________. Luke 3. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2012.
  • Brown, Raymond E. See under Matthew (1993).
  • ________. See under Matthew (1994).
  • Carroll, John T. Luke: A Commentary. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2012.
  • Culpepper, R. Alan. “The Gospel of Luke: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 1-490 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 9. Nashville: Abingdon, 1995.
  • Fitzmyer, Joseph A. The Gospel According to Luke. 2 vols. Anchor Bible. Garden City: Doubleday, 1981, 1985.
  • Green, Joel B. The Gospel of Luke. New International Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids, Mich., and Cambridge, U.K.: Eerdmans, 1997.
  • Johnson, Luke Timothy. The Gospel of Luke. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1991.
  • ________. The Gospel of Luke. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2006.
  • Marshall, I. Howard. The Gospel of Luke: A Commentary on the Greek Text. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1978.
  • Miller, A. C. Rumors of Resistance: Status Reversals and Hidden Transcripts in the Gospel of Luke. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2014.
  • Rowe, C.K. Early Narrative Christology: The Lord in the Gospel of Luke. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2009.
  • Tannehill, Robert C. Luke. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 1996.

John

  • Ashton, John. Understanding the Fourth Gospel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991.
  • Barrett, Charles Kingsley. The Gospel According to St. John. 2d ed. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1978.
  • Bauckham, Richard. The Testimony of the Beloved Disciple: Narrative, History, and Theology in the Gospel of John. Grand Rapids: Baker, 2007.
  • Borgen, Peder. The Gospel of John: More Light from Philo, Paul and Archaeology: The Scripture, Tradition, Exposition, Settings, and Meaning. Leiden: Brill, 2014.
  • Brown, Raymond E. The Gospel According to John. 2 vols. Anchor Bible. Garden City: Doubleday, 1966, 1970.
  • ________. See under Matthew (1994).
  • Brown, Sherri. and F. J. Moloney. Interpreting the Gospel and letters of John: An introduction. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2017.
  • Bultmann, Rudolf. The Gospel of John: A Commentary. Oxford: Blackwell, 1971.
  • Byers, A. J. Ecclesiology and Theosis in the Gospel of John. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2017
  • Charlesworth, James H. The Beloved Disciple: Whose Witness Validates the Gospel of John? Valley Forge, PA: Trinity Press International, 1995.
  • Culpepper, R. Alan. Anatomy of the Fourth Gospel: A Study in Literary Design. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1983.
  • Koester, Craig. Symbolism in the Fourth Gospel: Mystery, Meaning, Community. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2003.
  • __________. The Word of Life: A Theology of John’s Gospel.  Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2008.
  • Larsen, K. B. (ed.). The Gospel of John as Genre Mosaic. Bristol: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2015.
  • Martyn, J. Louis. History and Theology in the Fourth Gospel. New York: Harper & Row, 1968.
  • Moloney, Francis. The Gospel of John. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1998.
  • O’Day, Gail. “The Gospel of John: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 491-865 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 9. Nashville: Abingdon,1995.
  • Schnackenburg, Rudolf. The Gospel According to St. John. 3 vols. New York: Crossroad [Seabury], 1980, 1982.
  • Smith, D. Moody. John. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 1999.
  • Thompson, Marianne Meye. John: A Commentary. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2015.

Acts

  • Barrett, Charles Kingsley. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles. 2 vols. International Critical Commentary. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1994, 1998.
  • Barreto, E. D., M. L. Skinner, and S. Walton. Reading Acts in the Discourses of Masculinity and Politics. New York: Bloomsbury/T & T Clark, 2017.
  • Billings, D. W. Acts of the Apostles and the Rhetoric of Roman Imperialism. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2017.
  • Black, C. Clifton. The Rhetoric of the Gospel: Theological Artistry in the Gospels and Acts. 2nd ed. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2013.
  • Bonz, M. P. The Past as Legacy: Luke–Acts and Ancient Epic. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2000.
  • Dibelius, M. The Book of Acts: Form, Style, and Theology. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2004.
  • Fitzmyer, Joseph A. The Acts of the Apostles: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible. New York and London: Doubleday, 1998.
  • Gaventa, Beverly Roberts. Acts. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 2003.
  • Green, J. B. Conversion in Luke-Acts: A Divine Action, Human Cognition, and the People of God. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2015.
  • Holladay, Carl R. Acts: A Commentary. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2016.
  • Johnson, Luke Timothy. The Acts of the Apostles. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1992.
  • Keener, Craig S. Acts: An Exegetical Commentary. 4 vols. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2012–15.
  • Levine, A. –J. and M. Blickenstaff (eds.). A Feminist Companion to the Acts of the Apostles. London: T. & T. Clark, 2004.
  • Marguerat, D. The First Christian Historian: Writing the ‘Acts of the Apostles.’ Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.
  • Parsons, Mikeal C. Acts. Paideia. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2008.
  • Pervo, Richard. Acts. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2009.
  • Rowe, C. Kavin. World Upside Down: Reading Acts in the Graeco-Roman Age. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.
  • Shauf, S. The Divine in Acts and in Ancient Historiography. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2015.
  • Spencer, F. Scott. Journeying through Acts: A Literary-Cultural Reading. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2004.

Romans

  • Achtemeier, Paul. Romans. Interpretation. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1985.
  • Byrant, K. E. Paul and the Rise of the Slave: Death and Resurrection of the Oppressed in the Epistle to the Romans. Boston: Brill, 2016.
  • Byrne, Brendan. Romans. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1996.
  • Cranfield, Charles E. B. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans. 2 vols. International Critical Commentary. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1975, 1979.
  • Croasmun, M. The Emergence of Sin: The Cosmic Tyrant in Romans. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017.
  • Dunn, James D.G. Romans. 2 vols. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas: Word, 1988.
  • Fitzmyer, Joseph A. Romans: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible 33. New York: Doubleday, 1993.
  • Fowler, P.B. The Structure of Romans:The Argument of Paul’s Letter. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2016.
  • Jewett, Robert. Romans. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2007.
  • Käsemann, Ernst. Commentary on Romans. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1980.
  • Keck, Leander. Romans. Abingdon New Testament Commentary. Nashville: Abingdon, 2005.
  • Longenecker, Richard N. The Epistle to the Romans: A Commentary on the Greek Text. New International Greek Testament Commentary. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2016.
  • Moo, Douglas. The Epistle to the Romans. New International Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996.
  • Rodríguez, R. and M. Thiessen (eds.). The So-Called Jew in Paul’s Letter to the Romans. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2016.
  • Wright, N. T. “The Letter to the Romans: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 393-770 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 10. Nashville: Abingdon, 2002.

I Corinthians

  • Barrett, Charles Kingsley. The First Epistle to the Corinthians. Harper's New Testament Commentaries. New York: Harper & Row, 1968.
  • Campbell, Charles L. 1 Corinthians. Theological Commentary on the Bible. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2018.
  • Collins, R. F. First Corinthians. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2006.
  • Fee, Gordon D. The First Epistle to the Corinthians. New International Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1987.
  • Friesen, S.J., D.N. Schowalter, and J.C.Walters. Corinth in Context: Comparative Studies on Religion and Society. Leiden: Brill, 2010.
  • Fitzmyer, Joseph  A. First Corinthians: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008.
  • Hays, Richard B. First Corinthians. Interpretation. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1997.
  • Mitchell, Margaret M. Paul, the Corinthians, and the Birth of Christian Hermeneutics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.
  • Perkins, Pheme. First Corinthians. Paideia. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2012.
  • Sampley, J. Paul. “The First Letter to the Corinthians: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 771-1003 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 10. Nashville: Abingdon, 2002.
  • Thiselton, Anthony C. The First Epistle to the Corinthians: A Commentary on the Greek Text. New International Greek Testament Commentary. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000.

II Corinthians

  • Barrett, Charles Kingsley. The Second Epistle to the Corinthians. Harper's New Testament Commentaries. New York: Harper & Row, 1973.
  • Bowens, Lisa M. Apostle in Battle: Paul and Spiritual Warfare in 2 Corinthians 12:1–10. Tübingen: Mohr–Siebeck, 2017.
  • Furnish, Victor Paul. II Corinthians. Anchor Bible. Garden City: Doubleday, 1984.
  • Guthrie, George H. 2 Corinthians. Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2015.
  • Harris, Murray J. 2 Corinthians. New International Greek New Testament Commentary. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2005.
  • Lambrecht, Jan. Second Corinthians. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville: Liturgical, 1999.
  • Martin, Ralph P. 2 Corinthians. Word Biblical Commentary. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2014.
  • Matera, Frank J. II Corinthians: A Commentary. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2003.
  • Roetzel, Calvin J. 2 Corinthians.  Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 2007.
  • Sampley, J. Paul. “The Second Letter to the Corinthians: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 2-180 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 11. Nashville:Abingdon, 2000.
  • Thrall, Margaret E. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Second Epistle to the Corinthians. 2 vols. International Critical Commentary. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1994, 2000.

Galatians

  • Burton, Ernest de Witt. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians. International Critical Commentary. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1962.
  • Cousar, Charles B. Galatians. Interpretation. Atlanta: John Knox, 1982.
  • Das, A. Andrew. Paul and the Stories of Israel: Grand Thematic Narratives in Galatians. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2016. 
  • Dunn, James D.G. The Epistle to the Galatians. Black’s New Testament Commentary. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1993.
  • de Boer, Martinus C. Galatians: A Commentary. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2011.
  • Eastman, Susan G. Recovering Paul’s Mother Tongue: Language and Theology in Galatians. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2007.
  • Ebeling, Gerhard. The Truth of the Gospel: An Exposition of Galatians. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1985.
  • Hays, Richard. B. The Faith of Jesus Christ: An Investigation of the Narrative Substructure of Galatians 3:1-4:11. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002.
  • __________. “The Letter to the Galatians: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 183-348 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 11. Nashville: Abingdon, 2000.
  • Kahl, Brigitte. Galatians Re-Imagined: Reading through the Eyes of the Vanquished. Paul in Critical Context. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2010.
  • Longenecker, Richard. Galatians. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas: Word, 1990.
  • Martyn, J. Louis. Galatians: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible. New York: Doubleday, 1997.
  • Matera, Frank. Galatians. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1992.
  • Oakes, Peter. Galatians. Paideia. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2015.
  • Riches, John K. Galatians Through the Centuries. Blackwell Bible Commentaries. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2008.

Ephesians

  • Best, Ernest. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Ephesians. International Critical Commentary. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1998.
  • Fowl,  Stephen  E. Ephesians:  A  Commentary. New  Testament  Library.  Louisville:  Westminster John Knox, 2012.
  • Lincoln, Andrew T. Ephesians. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas: Word, 1990.
  • MacDonald, Margaret Y. Colossians and Ephesians. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville: Liturgical, 2000.
  • Muddiman, John. The Epistle to the Ephesians. Black’s New Testament Commentary. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2004.
  • Perkins, Pheme. Ephesians. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 1997.
  • Thielman, Frank. Ephesians. Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2010.

Philippians

  • Barth, Karl. The Epistle to the Philippians. Translated by James W. Leitch. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2002.
  • Bockmuehl, Markus. The Epistle to the Philippians. Black’s New Testament Commentary. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1998.
  • Cousar, Charles. Philippians and Philemon. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2009.
  • Fee, Gordon D. Paul's Letter to the Philippians. New International Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995.
  • Holloway, Paul A. Philippians: A Commentary. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2017.
  • Hooker, Morna D. “The Letter to the Philippians: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 469-549 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 11. Nashville: Abingdon, 2000.
  • Jennings, Mark A. The Price of Partnership in the Letter of Paul to the Philippians: “Make My Joy Complete.” New York: Bloomsbury/T & T Clark, 2018.
  • Osiek, Carolyn. Philippians, Philemon. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 2000.
  • Reumann, John. Philippians: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008.
  • Thompson, James W. and B. W. Longenecker. Philippians and Philemon. Paideia. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2016. 

Colossians [see also under Ephesians and Philemon]

  • Copenhaver, Adam. Reconstructing the Historical Background of Paul’s Rhetoric in the Letter to the Colossians. New York: Bloomsbury/T & T Clark, 2018.
  • Dunn, James D. G. The Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon. New International Greek Testament Commentary. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996.
  • Foster, Paul. Colossians. Black’s New Testament Commentaries. London: Bloomsbury, 2016.
  • Hay, David M. Colossians. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 2000.
  • Lincoln, Andrew T. “The Letter to the Colossians: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 553-669 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 11. Nashville: Abingdon, 2000.
  • Pokorny, Petr. Colossians: A Commentary. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1991.
  • Schweizer, Eduard. The Letter to the Colossians: A Commentary. Minneapolis: Augsburg, 1982.
  • Sumney, Jerry L. Colossians: A Commentary. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2008.
  • Thompson, Marianne Meye. Colossians and Philemon. Two Horizons. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2005.

I, II Thessalonians

  • Boring, M. Eugene. I and II Thessalonians: A Commentary. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2015.
  • Donfried, Karl P. Paul, Thessalonica, and Early Christianity. Edinburgh:T.& T. Clark, 2002.
  • Fee, Gordon D. The First and Second Letters to the Thessalonians. New International Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2009.
  • Furnish, Victor. 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 2007.
  • Gaventa, Beverly Roberts. First and Second Thessalonians. Interpretation. Louisville: John Knox, 1998.
  • Johnson, Andy. 1 and 2 Thessalonians. Two Horizons. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2016.

I, II Timothy and Titus

  • Aageson, James W. Paul, the Pastoral Epistles, and the Early Church. Library of Pauline Studies. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2008.
  • Bassler, Jouette M. 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 1996.
  • Collins, Raymond F. I & II Timothy and Titus: A Commentary. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2002.
  • Fiore, Benjamin. The Pastoral Epistles: First Timothy, Second Timothy, and Titus. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2009.
  • Hoklotubbe, T. Christopher. Civilized Piety: The Rhetoric of Pietas in the Pastoral Epistles and the Roman Empire. Waco: Baylor University Press, 2017.
  • Johnson, Luke Timothy. The First and Second Letters to Timothy. A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible. New York and London: Doubleday, 2001.
  • Marshall, I Howard and P. H. Towner. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles. International Critical Commentary. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1999.
  • Quinn, Jerome D. The Letter to Titus. A New Translation with Notes and Commentary, and An Introduction to Titus, I and II Timothy, The Pastoral Epistles. Anchor Bible. New York: Doubleday, 1990.
  • Towner, Philip H. The Letters of Timothy and Titus. New International Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids:Eerdmans, 2006.

Philemon [see also under Colossians]

  • Barth, Markus and H. Blanke. The Letter to Philemon: A New Translation with Notes and Commentary. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000.
  • Felder, Cain Hope. “The Letter to Philemon: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 883-905 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 11. Nashville: Abingdon, 2000.
  • Fitzmyer, Joseph A. The Letter to Philemon: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible. New York and London: Doubleday, 2000.
  • McKnight, Scot. The Letter to Philemon. New International Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2017.
  • Osiek, Carolyn. See under Philippians (2000).

Hebrews

  • Attridge, Harold W. The Epistle to the Hebrews. Hermeneia. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1989.
  • Bauckham, Richard (ed.). The Epistle to the Hebrews and Christian Theology. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2009.
  • Church, Philip. Hebrews and the Temple: Attitudes to the Temple in Second Temple Judaism and in Hebrews. Boston: Brill, 2017.
  • Cockerill, Gareth L. The Epistle to the Hebrews. New International Commentary on the New Testament. GrandRapids: Eerdmans, 2012.
  • Easter, Matthew C. Faith and the Faithfulness of Jesus in Hebrews. Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014.
  • Ellingworth, Paul. The Epistle to the Hebrews: A Commentary on the Greek Text. New International Greek Testament Commentary. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1993.
  • Johnson, Luke Timothy. Hebrews. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2006.
  • Koester, Craig R. Hebrews: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible. New York and London: Doubleday, 2001.
  • Lindars, Barnabas. The Theology of the Letter to the Hebrews. New Testament Theology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.
  • Thompson, James W. Hebrews. Paideia. Grand Rapids: Baker, 2008.

James

  • Allison, Jr., Dale C. James. International Critical Commentary. London: Bloomsbury, 2013.
  • Anderson, Kelly and D. Keating. James, First, Second, Third John. Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2017.
  • Batten, Alicia J. Friendship and Benefaction in James. Emory Studies in Early Christianity. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2017.
  • Davids, Peter. Commentary on James. New International Greek Testament Commentary. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1982.
  • Hartin, Patrick J. James. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical, 2003.
  • Johnson, Luke Timothy. The Letter of James. Anchor Bible. New York: Doubleday, 1995.
  • ________. “The Letter of James: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 175-225 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 12. Nashville: Abingdon, 1998.
  • Laws, Sophie. The Epistle of James. Harper's New Testament Commentaries. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1980.
  • McKnight, Scot. The Letter of James. New International Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2011.
  • Sleeper, C. Freeman. James. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 1998.

I Peter

  • Achtemeier, Paul J. 1 Peter: A Commentary on the First Epistle of Peter. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996.
  • Bartlett, David L. “The First Letter of Peter: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 227-319 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 12. Nashville: Abingdon, 1998.
  • Boring, M. Eugene. 1 Peter. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 1999.
  • Donelson, Lewis R. I & II Peter and Jude. New Testament Library. Louisville, Westminster John Knox, 2010.
  • Elliott, John H. 1 Peter: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible. New York and London: Doubleday, 2000.
  • Goppelt, Leonhard. A Commentary on I Peter. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1993.
  • Green, Joel B. 1 Peter. Two Horizons. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2007.
  • Horrell, David G. 1 Peter. New Testament Guides. London: T. & T. Clark, 2008.
  • Senior, Donald. 1 Peter, Jude, and 2 Peter. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 2003.

II Peter and Jude

  • Bauckham, Richard J. Jude, 2 Peter. Word Biblical Commentary. Waco: Word, 1983.
  • Donelson, Lewis R. See under 1 Peter (2010).
  • Kraftchick, Steven J. 2 Peter, Jude. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 2002.
  • Neyrey, Jerome H. 2 Peter, Jude. Anchor Bible. New York: Doubleday, 1993.
  • Robinson, Alexandra. Jude on Attack: A Comparative Analysis of the Epistle of Jude, Jewish Judgment Oracles, and Greco-Roman Invective. Library of New Testament Studies. New York: Bloomsbury/T & T Clark, 2018.
  • Senior, Donald. See under 1 Peter (2003).
  • Watson, Duane F. “The Second Letter of Peter: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections;” “The Letter of Jude: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 321-61, 473-99 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 12. Nashville: Abingdon, 1998.

I, II, III John

  • Black, C. Clifton. “The First, Second, and Third Letters of John: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 363-469 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 12. Nashville: Abingdon, 1998.
  • Brown, Raymond E. The Epistles of John. Anchor Bible. Garden City: Doubleday, 1982.
  • Lieu, Judith. I,II, III John. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2008.
  • Painter, John. 1, 2, and 3 John. Sacra Pagina. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical, 2008.
  • Parsenios, George L. First, Second and Third John. Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2014.
  • Rensberger, David. 1 John, 2 John, 3 John. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 1997. 
  • Schnackenburg, Rudolf. The Johannine Epistles. A Commentary. New York: Crossroad, 1992.
  • Smith, D. Moody. First, Second, and Third John. Interpretation. Louisville: John Knox, 1991.
  • Strecker, Georg. The Johannine Letters: A Commentary on 1, 2, and 3 John. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996.

Revelation

  • Aune, David E. Revelation 1–5. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas: Word, 1997.
  • _________. Revelation 6–16. Word Biblical Commentary. Nashville: Nelson, 1998.
  • _________. Revelation 17–22. Word Biblical Commentary. Nashville: Nelson, 1998.
  • Battle, Michael. Heaven on Earth: God’s Call to Community in the Book of Revelation. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2017.
  • Blount, Brian. Revelation. New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2009.
  • Boring, M. Eugene. Revelation. Interpretation. Louisville: John Knox, 1989.
  • Caird, George B. A Commentary on the Revelation of St. John the Divine. Harper's New Testament Commentaries. New York: Harper & Row, 1966.
  • Charles, R.H. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Revelation of St. John. International Critical Commentary. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1956-59.
  • Friesen, Steven J. Imperial Cults and the Apocalypse of John: Revelation in the Ruins. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.
  • Himmelfarb, Martha. The Apocalypse: A Brief History. Blackwell Brief History of Religion. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
  • Koester, Craig R. Revelation and the End of All Things. 2nd ed. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001.
  • _________. Revelation: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. Anchor Bible. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014.
  • Kovacs, Judith, and Christopher Rowland. Revelation. Blackwell Bible Commentaries. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004.
  • Levine, A.-J. and M. M. Robbins (eds.). A Feminist Companion to the Apocalypse of John. London: T. & T. Clark, 2009.
  • Rowland, Christopher C. “The Book of Revelation: Introduction, Commentary, and Reflections.” Pp. 501-743 in The New Interpreter’s Bible 12. Nashville: Abingdon, 1998.
  • Thompson, Leonard L. Revelation. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 1998.
  • Williamson, Peter S. Revelation. Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2015.

Biblical Studies Department at Princeton Theological Seminary